Anadarko, Oklahoma (Caddo County)

As of Tue, Jan 19, 2021, 8:55 AM EST

2Confirmed Cases: 3,319​ (+ 5.2% Since last week)

Oklahoma Confirmed Cases: 356,816

Deaths: 42​ (+ 2.4% Since last week)

 

Deaths: 2,994

Worldwide Statistics

Location Confirmed Cases Cases per 1,000 people Deaths
Worldwide 93,729,320 12.13 2,025,811
United States of America 23,556,676 71.17 392,641
India 10,581,837 7.67 152,556
Brazil 8,488,099 39.93 209,847
Russia 3,591,066 24.61 66,037
United Kingdom 3,395,963 50.02 89,261
France 2,863,613 43.87 69,894
Italy 2,381,277 39.38 82,177
Spain 2,211,967 47.31 53,079
Germany 2,040,659 24.36 46,633
Colombia 1,908,413 37.51 48,631
Argentina 1,799,243 39.81 45,407
Mexico 1,641,428 12.73 140,704
Turkey 1,572,763 18.65 23,997
Poland 1,438,914 38.02 33,407
South Africa 1,337,926 22.56 37,105
Iran 1,336,217 15.91 56,886
Ukraine 1,163,716 26.61 20,869
Peru 1,064,909 32.3 38,871
Indonesia 917,015 3.35 26,282
Netherlands 912,554 53.26 13,006
Czech Republic 891,852 83.28 14,449
Canada 708,619 18.78 18,014
Romania 693,644 36.06 17,221
Belgium 678,839 58.57 20,435
Chile 673,750 35.24 17,547
Iraq 609,029 15.14 12,953
Portugal 549,801 53.92 8,861
Israel 544,791 62.94 3,981
Bangladesh 528,329 3.21 7,922
Sweden 523,486 51.83 10,323
Pakistan 521,211 2.36 10,997
Philippines 502,736 4.59 9,909
Switzerland 492,787 56.94 7,930
Morocco 460,144 12.47 7,977
Austria 391,113 43.43 7,014
Serbia 372,533 42.64 3,750
Saudi Arabia 365,099 10.49 6,329
Hungary 352,703 36.51 11,409
Japan 334,328 2.64 4,548
Jordan 315,544 30.93 4,153
Panama 298,019 69.07 4,787
Nepal 267,644 9.19 1,965
United Arab Emirates 256,732 25.96 751
Lebanon 255,956 37.5 1,959
Georgia 247,915 62.15 2,958
Ecuador 231,644 13.13 14,322
Azerbaijan 227,273 22.42 3,009
Croatia 225,128 54.84 4,655
Slovakia 224,385 41.1 3,526
Belarus 223,537 23.66 1,573
Kazakhstan 215,947 11.5 2,956
Bulgaria 211,813 30.48 8,483
Dominican Republic 194,966 17.97 2,448
Denmark 189,088 32.65 1,775
Bolivia 187,183 16.04 9,636
Costa Rica 184,187 36.16 2,416
Tunisia 181,885 15.39 5,750
Ireland 172,726 34.98 2,608
Lithuania 167,992 61.71 2,469
Armenia 164,676 55.57 2,998
Malaysia 161,740 5 605
Kuwait 158,244 37.05 948
Egypt 157,275 1.54 8,638
Moldova 152,854 37.89 3,250
Guatemala 149,146 8.32 5,278
Slovenia 149,131 71.73 3,361
Greece 148,607 14.26 5,469
Qatar 147,504 51.2 248
Myanmar 134,795 2.48 2,973
Honduras 134,111 13.54 3,354
Oman 132,011 25.85 1,514
Ethiopia 131,195 1.14 2,030
Paraguay 122,160 17.13 2,505
Venezuela 119,803 4.21 1,106
Bosnia and Herzegovina 117,973 35.96 4,472
Nigeria 110,387 0.54 1,435
Libya 109,869 15.99 1,698
Algeria 103,833 2.37 2,841
Kenya 99,162 1.84 1,731
People’s Republic of China 99,026 0.07 4,805
Bahrain 97,940 57.56 360
North Macedonia 88,938 42.69 2,702
Puerto Rico 87,939 30.74 1,703
Kyrgyzstan 83,178 12.75 1,387
Uzbekistan 78,036 2.33 619
South Korea 73,115 1.43 1,283
Albania 67,690 23.52 1,277
Singapore 59,127 10.11 29
Norway 58,445 10.78 517
Ghana 57,714 1.86 346
Latvia 55,664 29.51 978
Montenegro 55,561 88.46 745
Afghanistan 54,141 1.39 2,346
Sri Lanka 53,750 2.51 270
El Salvador 51,437 7.93 1,498
Luxembourg 48,844 78.03 552
Finland 39,911 7.2 618
Uganda 38,085 0.83 304
Zambia 37,605 2.05 546
Estonia 37,344 28.15 333
Uruguay 32,378 9.32 311
Namibia 30,363 11.95 285
Cyprus 28,968 23.99 170
Australia 28,721 1.13 909
Democratic Republic of the Congo 28,401 0.32 744
Cameroon 28,010 1.06 455
Zimbabwe 27,203 1.83 713
Mozambique 26,551 0.85 241
Sudan 26,279 0.6 1,603
Ivory Coast 25,241 0.96 141
Senegal 23,028 1.38 515
Angola 18,875 0.57 436
Cuba 18,443 1.63 173
Madagascar 18,301 0.66 273
French Polynesia 17,697 63 127
Botswana 16,648 7.08 71
Mauritania 16,039 3.45 402
Malta 15,588 35.3 239
French Guiana 15,055 50.4 76
Maldives 14,582 26.98 49
Jamaica 14,274 4.82 326
Guinea 14,114 1.07 81
Tajikistan 13,705 1.44 91
Syria 13,132 0.75 841
Cape Verde 12,993 23.37 119
Swaziland 12,944 11.16 376
Thailand 12,594 0.18 70
Malawi 12,470 0.65 314
Belize 11,580 29.12 281
Rwanda 11,032 0.85 142
Haiti 10,852 0.95 240
Gabon 9,899 4.45 66
Réunion 9,443 10.55 45
Burkina Faso 9,188 0.44 102
Andorra 9,038 116.97 91
Guadeloupe 8,948 22.36 156
The Bahamas 8,067 20.51 175
Mali 7,839 0.39 310
Suriname 7,527 12.83 141
Trinidad and Tobago 7,393 5.28 132
Guam 7,287 43.17 128
Guyana 6,908 8.78 170
Mayotte 6,611 24.23 58
Aruba 6,435 60.27 52
Lesotho 6,371 2.97 97
Martinique 6,302 16.79 44
Iceland 5,956 17.45 29
Djibouti 5,906 5.98 61
Equatorial Guinea 5,356 3.82 86
Central African Republic 4,973 1.03 63
Nicaragua 4,916 0.74 167
Somalia 4,744 0.3 130
Curaçao 4,520 27.54 19
Togo 4,302 0.52 73
Niger 4,156 0.17 140
The Gambia 3,910 1.62 127
South Sudan 3,703 0.33 63
Gibraltar 3,637 107.95 34
Benin 3,413 0.28 46
Jersey 3,047 17.53 62
Sierra Leone 3,006 0.38 77
Chad 2,895 0.18 111
San Marino 2,778 81.86 65
Guinea-Bissau 2,478 1.26 45
Liechtenstein 2,441 64.01 40
United States Virgin Islands 2,260 21.64 24
Yemen 2,117 0.07 613
New Zealand 1,906 0.4 25
Liberia 1,887 0.37 84
Eritrea 1,877 0.53 6
Sint Maarten 1,656 38.62 27
Comoros 1,592 1.83 45
Vietnam 1,539 0.02 35
Mongolia 1,526 0.47 1
Burundi 1,245 0.1 2
Monaco 1,205 30.71 8
São Tomé and Príncipe 1,142 5.21 17
Saint Martin 1,117 28.89 12
Turks and Caicos Islands 1,102 28.46 6
Barbados 1,095 3.81 7
Bhutan 843 1.09 1
Papua New Guinea 834 0.09 9
Republic of the Congo 779 0.14 25
Seychelles 689 7.01 2
Bermuda 670 10.76 12
Faroe Islands 649 13.28 1
Saint Lucia 621 3.38 8
Mauritius 547 0.43 10
Tanzania 509 0.01 21
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 494 4.45 2
Cambodia 441 0.03 –*
Isle of Man 419 4.93 25
Cayman Islands 374 5.69 2
Bonaire 340 12.97 3
Guernsey 309 1.78 13
Saint-Barthélemy 281 28.43 –*
Antigua and Barbuda 189 1.93 6
Brunei 174 0.4 3
Grenada 139 1.24 1
Northern Mariana Islands 129 2.24 2
British Virgin Islands 121 4 1
Dominica 110 1.53 –*
Fiji 55 0.06 2
East Timor 52 0.04 –*
New Caledonia 44 0.15 –*
Laos 41 0.01 –*
Saint Kitts and Nevis 35 0.66 –*
Falkland Islands 32 9.19 –*
Greenland 30 0.53 –*
Solomon Islands 17 0.02 –*
Saint Pierre and Miquelon 16 2.76 –*
Anguilla 15 1 –*
Montserrat 13 2.6 1
Marshall Islands 4 0.07 –*
Wallis and Futuna 4 0.36 –*
Federated States of Micronesia 1 0.01 –*
Vanuatu 1 0 –*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus Pandemic Whole-of-America Response

Medical Supplies and Equipment

  • As of Nov. 27, FEMA, HHS and the private sector coordinated delivery of or are currently shipping: 373.4 million N95 masks, 1.5 billion surgical and procedural masks, 78.7 million eye and face shields, 641.2 million gowns and coveralls and over 36.5 billion gloves.
  • As of Aug. 7, FEMA delivered 30,458 medical supplies to nursing homes to 52 states and territories. One hundred percent of scheduled shipments have been made.
    • FEMA coordinated two shipments totaling a 14-day supply of personal protective equipment to all 15,400 Medicaid and Medicare-certified nursing homes.
    • Shipments are meant to supplement existing efforts to provide equipment to nursing homes.
  • In support of the Department of Veterans Affairs, FEMA coordinated shipments of more than 8.1 million N95 respirator masks, 500,000 surgical masks, more than 3.3 million gloves, 595,360 face shields and 30,000 surgical gowns to facilities across the country.
  • As of Nov. 27, the federal government has approximately 152,638 total ventilators available in the Strategic National Stockpile.
  • To date, FEMA, HHS and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Cybersecurity Infrastructure and Security Agency (CISA), along with other federal agencies, processed and distributed nearly 350 million cloth face coverings.
    • Nearly 150 million of those went to critical infrastructure workers, others went to State, Tribal, Territorial, Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) partners/stakeholders and other government partners.

Testing

  • As of Nov. 27, CDC, state, local public health labs and other laboratories have tested more than 188.3 million samples.
    • As of Nov. 24 the FDA issued 291 individual emergency use authorizations for test kit manufacturers and laboratories, including 59 antibody tests and 7 antigen tests.
  • As of July 31, all 41 original Community-Based Testing Sites have transitioned to state management (29) or have closed (12) in consultation with the states.
    • As of Aug. 4, 398,300 samples were collected at federally supported Community-Based Testing Sites.
  • HHS has established a public-private partnership with pharmacy and retail companies to accelerate testing.
    • As of Nov. 30, Under the CBTS public-private partnership, there are currently 1,857 live sites in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico are conducting testing.
    • Over 5.2 million samples were processed at public-private partnership testing sites.

Federal Funding

  • As of Sept. 30, all 50 states, five territories, the Seminole Tribe of Florida and Washington, D.C., were approved for major disaster declarations to assist with additional needs identified.
    • As of Sept. 30, there are 89 tribes working directly with FEMA: 45 tribes that are direct recipients with emergency declarations and 44 tribes that are recipients under state declarations. One tribe, the Seminole Tribe of Florida (STOF) is, a direct recipient with a major disaster and an emergency declaration,
    • A tribal government may choose to be a subrecipient under a state receiving FEMA assistance, or to choose to be a direct recipient of FEMA.
  • As of Nov. 27, FEMA obligated over $55.7 billion in support of COVID-19 efforts. This support includes:
    • Emergency Food and Shelter: $200 million
    • Temporary Medical Facilities including medical personnel, mortuary and ambulance services: over $2 billion
    • PPE including medical supplies and pharmaceuticals: $3.9 billion
    • National Guard: $2.7 billion
    • Public Assistance Emergency Protective Measures (Non-PPE): $3 billion
    • Commodities: $36 million
    • Crisis Counseling: $406 million
  • On August 8, 2020, President Trump made available up to $44 billion from FEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund to provide financial assistance to Americans who have lost wages due to the COVID-19 pandemic. To learn more about FEMA’s lost wages supplemental payment assistance, visit: https://www.fema.gov/fact-sheet/fema-lost-wages-supplemental-payment-assistance.
    • Over $42 billion made available to 49 states and two territories, and Washington, D.C. through the Lost Wages Assistance program

Additional Federal Support

  • As of Nov. 30, FEMA has 1,260 employees supporting COVID-19 pandemic response out of a total 20,831 agency employees ready to respond to other emergencies should they occur.
  • To date, the president has approved 49 National Guard requests for federal support for the use of National Guard personnel in a Title 32 duty status through Dec. 31.
    • As of Nov. 27, 18,849 National Guard troops have activated in T-32 duty status and 1,227 troops have activated in State Active Duty status to help with testing and other response efforts.
  • As of Nov. 23, 7,763 CDC personnel are supporting the outbreak response.
  • As of Nov. 25, HHS has 245 (plus about 600 for Operation Warp Speed) personnel supporting the COVID-19 response.
  • As of Nov. 30 127 agencies across 30 states, the District of Columbia, three tribes and one U.S. territory have used FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to send a total of 530 alerts containing information on COVID-19 to cell phones and other wireless devices via the Wireless Emergency Alert system, and 102 alerts to radios/televisions via Emergency Alert System.

Lost Wages Assistance Totals

State/Territory

Award Granted (weeks 1-3)

Award Granted (week 4)

Award Granted (week 5)

Award Granted (week 6)

Alabama

$173,400,000

$54,700,000

$49,200,000

$52,800,000

Alaska

$40,700,000

$12,600,000

$11,400,000

$7,400,000

Arizona *

$498,100,000

 

$122,600,000

$446,200,000

Arkansas

$79,400,000

$24,800,000

$24,000,000

$23,700,000

California

$4,510,000,000

$1,430,000,000

$1,490,000,000

$1,510,000,000

CNMI

$7,700,000

 

 

 

Colorado

$264,500,000

$97,900,000

$97,500,000

$94,200,000

Connecticut

$225,600,000

$75,000,000

$75,000,000

$70,500,000

Delaware

$46,800,000

$13,700,000

$8,700,000

$8,300,000

District of Columbia

$74,700,000

$23,600,000

$24,100,000

$23,600,000

Florida

$918,200,000

$299,200,000

 

 

Georgia

$818,500,000

$277,300,000

$278,900,000

$281,200,000

Guam

$22,600,000

$7,500,000

$7,500,000

$7,500,000

Hawaii

$193,900,000

$53,400,000

$53,400,000

$70,300,000

Idaho

$27,000,000

$10,300,000

$10,000,000

 

Illinois

$723,300,000

$216,000,000

$206,400,000

$203,400,000

Indiana

$212,600,000

$64,000,000

$78,000,000

$96,300,000

Iowa

$110,400,000

$35,500,000

$35,200,000

$35,000,000

Kansas

$63,400,000

$19,600,000

$18,400,000

$15,500,000

Kentucky

$104,500,000

$37,200,000

$37,200,000

$37,200,000

Louisiana

$372,100,000

$123,600,000

$92,700,000

$92,700,000

Maine

$74,100,000

$21,200,000

$20,500,000

$20,100,000

Maryland

$431,600,000

$143,700,000

$143,700,000

$143,700,000

Massachusetts

$644,600,000

$209,900,000

$205,500,000

$198,700,000

Michigan

$934,800,000

$292,900,000

$292,900,000

$292,900,000

Minnesota

$299,500,000

$99,800,000

$99,800,000

$99,800,000

Mississippi

$146,000,000

$31,200,000

$31,900,000

$33,200,000

Missouri *

$247,900,000

 

 

$118,800,000

Montana

$26,800,000

$6,800,000

$7,800,000

$7,300,000

Nebraska

$38,200,000

$18,900,000

$16,900,000

$16,400,000

 

BY THE NUMBERS: COVID-19 WHOLE-OF-AMERICA RESPONSE

 

Nevada

$225,500,000

$71,300,000

$67,800,000

$60,100,000

New Hampshire

$50,300,000

$17,900,000

$17,000,000

$16,600,000

New Jersey

$733,700,000

$236,800,000

$270,200,000

$238,000,000

New Mexico

$119,100,000

$38,700,000

$38,200,000

$37,000,000

New York

$2,120,000,000

$723,500,000

$678,600,000

$682,000,000

North Carolina

$375,600,000

$119,700,000

$117,000,000

$106,500,000

North Dakota

$14,900,000

$5,300,000

$5,300,000

$9,700,000

Ohio

$717,900,000

$231,000,000

$234,900,000

$224,100,000

Oklahoma

$151,300,000

$50,400,000

$50,400,000

$50,400,000

Oregon

$223,300,000

$68,100,000

$65,400,000

$64,700,000

Pennsylvania

$1,490,000,000

$467,400,000

$441,200,000

$428,700,000

Puerto Rico

$339,900,000

$109,700,000

$108,000,000

$104,700,000

Rhode Island

$101,000,000

$33,700,000

$29,200,000

$29,100,000

South Carolina

$185,900,000

$55,700,000

$52,300,000

$45,700,000

Tennessee

$236,000,000

$78,500,000

$78,600,000

$78,600,000

Texas

$1,380,000,000

$707,300,000

$568,500,000

$568,500,000

US Virgin Islands

$7,400,000

 

 

 

Utah

$55,200,000

$14,100,000

$12,300,000

$10,400,000

Vermont

$39,400,000

$12,000,000

$11,200,000

$11,200,000

Virginia

$378,700,000

$116,000,000

$112,800,000

$113,300,000

Washington

$462,200,000

$164,000,000

$169,700,000

$172,900,000

West Virginia

$68,300,000

$17,800,000

$17,000,000

$13,200,000

Wisconsin

$116,900,000

$35,700,000

$36,600,000

$40,100,000

Wyoming

$8,500,000

$2,700,000

$2,500,000

$2,400,000

54

$21,931,900,000

$7,077,600,000

$6,723,900,000

$7,114,600,000

* initial award includes supplemental weeks

 

TOTAL

$42,848,000,000

 

 

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of Coronavirus

What you need to know

  • Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms.
  • Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Watch for symptoms

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.

When to seek emergency medical attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

 

 

Testing

COVID-19 Testing Overview

Find out who should get tested. Protect yourself and others. Wear a mask, wash hands often, stay 6 ft from others.

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • A viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
  • An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection.

Considerations for who should get tested

  • People who have symptoms of COVID-19
  • People who have had close contact (within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes) with someone with confirmed COVID-19
  • People who have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, localexternal icon or state ​health department

Not everyone needs to be tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

How to get tested for current COVID-19 infection

  • You can visit your state or localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.

Results

  • If you test positive, know what protective steps to prevent others from getting sick.
  • If you test negative, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. Continue to take steps to protect yourself.

Test for Current Infection

Protect yourself and others. Wear a mask, wash hands often, stay 6 ft from others.

Considerations for who should get tested

  • People who have symptoms of COVID-19
  • People who have had close contact (within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes) with someone with confirmed COVID-19
  • People who have been asked or referred  to get testing by their healthcare provider, localexternal icon or state health department.

Not everyone needs to be tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

Take steps to protect yourself

Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

How to get a viral test

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19.  The time it takes to process these tests can vary.

  • You can visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. Find out what to do if you are sick.

What to do after a viral test

To get your test result, please check with the group that performed your test, such as your healthcare provider or health department. How long it will take to get your test results depends on the test used.

  • If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick.
    • Most people have mild COVID-19 illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.
  • If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. This does not mean you will not get sick:
    • A negative test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing or that your sample was collected too early in your infection.
    • You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and then get infected and spread the virus to others.
    • If you have symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

Test for Past Infection

Antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which may tell you if you had a past infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. Antibodies are proteins that help fight off infections and can provide protection against getting that disease again (immunity). Antibodies are disease specific. For example, measles antibodies will protect you from getting measles if you are exposed to it again, but they won’t protect you from getting mumps if you are exposed to mumps.

Except in instances in which viral testing is delayed, antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. To see if you are currently infected, you need a viral test. Viral tests identify the virus in samples from your respiratory system, such as a swab from the inside of your nose.

If you test positive or negative for COVID-19 on a viral or an antibody test, you still should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

We do not know yet if people who recover from COVID-19 can get infected again.  Scientists are working to understand this.

How to get an antibody test

Guidance on Interpreting COVID-19 Test Resultspdf iconexternal icon: A guide for understanding test results and determining what actions to take.

Decisions about testing are made by state or localexternal icon health departments or healthcare providers.​

Antibody tests for COVID-19 are available through healthcare providers and laboratories. Check with your healthcare provider to see if they offer antibody tests and whether you should get one.

What do your results mean?

If you test positive

  • A positive test result shows you may have antibodies from an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. However, there is a chance a positive result means that you have antibodies from an infection with a virus from the same family of viruses (called coronaviruses), such as the one that causes the common cold.
  • Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 may provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies may provide or how long this protection may last.
  • Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means. Your provider may suggest you take a second type of antibody test to see if the first test was accurate.
  • You should continue to protect yourself and others since you could get infected with the virus again.
    • If you work in a job where you wear personal protective equipment (PPE), continue wearing PPE.
  • You may test positive for antibodies even if you have never had symptoms of COVID-19. This can happen if you had an infection without symptoms, which is called an asymptomatic infection.

If you test negative

  • You may not have ever had COVID-19. Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means.
  • You could still have a current infection.
    • The test may be negative because it typically takes 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. It’s possible you could still get sick if you have been exposed to the virus recently. This means you could still spread the virus.
    • Some people may take even longer to develop antibodies, and some people who are infected may not ever develop antibodies.

If you get symptoms after the antibody test, you might need another test called a viral test​.

Regardless of whether you test positive or negative, the results do not confirm whether or not you are able to spread the virus that causes COVID-19. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others.

Learn more about using antibody tests to look for past infection.

Contact Tracing

Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps protect you, your family, and your community.

Contact tracing slows the spread of COVID-19 by

  • Letting people know they may have been exposed to COVID-19 and should monitor their health for signs and symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Helping people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 get tested.
  • Asking people to self-isolate if they have COVID-19 or self-quarantine if they are a close contact.
During contact tracing, the health department staff will not ask you for
  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Contact tracing for COVID-19 works best with everyday preventive actions

You can take everyday preventive actions to slow the spread of COVID-19. Doing so is especially important until a vaccine or better treatments become widely available.

What you can expect to happen

If you were around someone diagnosed with COVID-19

If you were around someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19, someone from the health department may call you.

Stay home away from others:

  • Stay away from others, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, such as older adults and people with other medical conditions, if possible.
  • If you have been around someone with COVID-19, stay home away from others for 14 days (self-quarantine) after your last contact with that person and monitor your health.
  • If you have a fever, cough or other symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and away from others (except to get medical care or testing, if recommended).
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-quarantine, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

For COVID-19, a close contact is anyone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes. An infected person can spread COVID-19 starting from 48 hours (or 2 days) before the person had any symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19.

Monitor your health:

  • Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19. Remember, symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19.

Answer the phone call from the health department. If someone from the health department calls you, answer the call to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in your community.

  • Discussions with health department staff are confidential. This means that your personal and medical information will be kept private and only shared with those who may need to know, like your health care provider.
  • Your name will not be shared with those you came in contact with. The health department will only notify people you were in close contact with (within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes) that they might have been exposed to COVID-19.

Tell the health department staff if you develop symptoms of COVID-19. If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

The health department staff will not ask you for

  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Did you know? Health department staff may use case management or exposure notification digital tools to help with contact tracing. Learn more about these types of digital tools.

If you are waiting for a COVID-19 test result

If you think you may have COVID-19 and are waiting for a COVID-19 test result, stay home and monitor your health to protect your friends, family and others from possibly getting COVID-19.

Stay home away from others:

  • Stay away from others while waiting for your COVID-19 test result, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, such as older adults and people with other medical conditions, if possible.
  • If you have been around someone with COVID-19, stay home and away from others for 14 days (self-quarantine) after your last contact with that person and monitor your health.
  • If you have a fever, cough or other symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and away from others (except to get medical care).
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-quarantine, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

Monitor your health:

  • Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19. Remember, symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19.

Think about the people you have recently been around. While you wait for your COVID-19 test result, think about everyone you have been around recently. This will be important information to have available.  If your test is positive, someone from the health department may call you to check on your health, discuss who you have been around, and ask where you spent time while you may have been able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Follow your health department’s guidelines when you receive your COVID-19 test result.

  • Positive test, whether or not you have symptoms
  • Negative test and you do not have symptoms
    • If your test is negative and you do not have symptoms, continue to stay away from others (self-quarantine) for 14 days after your last exposure to COVID-19 and follow all recommendations from the health department.
    • A negative result before the end of your quarantine period does not rule out possible infection.
    • You do not need a repeat test unless you develop symptoms, or if you require a test to return to work.
  • Negative test and you have symptoms
    • If your test is negative and you have symptoms you should continue to stay away from others (self-quarantine) for 14 days after your last exposure to COVID-19 and follow all recommendations from the health department. A second test and additional medical consultation may be needed if your symptoms do not improve.
    • If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, someone from the health department may call you to

  • Check on your health,
  • Discuss who you have been around, and
  • Ask where you have spent time while you may have been able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Discussions with health department staff are confidential. This means that your name and personal and medical information will be kept private and only shared with those who may need to know, like your health care provider.

  • Your name will not be shared with those you came in contact with. The health department will only notify people you were in close contact with (within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes) that they might have been exposed to COVID-19.

The health department staff will not ask you for

  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Any information you share with health department staff is CONFIDENTIAL. This means that your name and personal and medical information will be kept private.

Stay home away from others:

You will be asked to stay at home and self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

  • Stay home away from others except to get medical care.
    • Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign(including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.
    • Stay in a separate room from other household members and use a separate bathroom, if possible.
    • Avoid contact with other household members and pets.
    • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils.
    • Wear a mask when around other people, if able.
      Learn more about what to do if you are sick.
  • Self-isolation helps slow the spread of COVID-19 and can help keep your family, friends, neighbors, and others you may come in contact with healthy.
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-isolation, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

Monitor your health: If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

You can be around others after

  • 24 hours with no fever, and
  • Respiratory symptoms have improved (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), and
  • 10 days since symptoms first appeared.

Frequently Asked Questions

Spread

How does the virus spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in many affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Can the virus that cause COVID-19 be spread through food, including take out, refrigerated or frozen packaged food?

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person to person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day use a tissue to cover your coughing or sneezing, and wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature affect the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like those that cause the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

What is community spread?

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Each health department determines community spread differently based on local conditions. For information on community spread in your area, please visit your health department’s website.​

Can mosquitoes or ticks spread the virus that causes COVID-19?

At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.

Prevention

How can I protect myself?

Visit the How to Protect Yourself & Others page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.
Does the CDC recommend the use of facemask or face coverings to prevent COVI-19?

Wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people not living in your household and particularly where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations. Cloth face coverings may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.

COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. That’s why it’s important for everyone to practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet away from other people) and wear cloth face coverings in public settings. Cloth face coverings provide an extra layer to help prevent the respiratory droplets from traveling in the air and onto other people.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

More information about cloth face coverings can be found on our cloth face coverings site.

Is it safe to get care for my other medical conditions during this time?

  • It is important to continue taking care of your health and wellness.
  • Continue your medications, and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Continue to manage your disease the way your healthcare provider has told you.
  • Have at least a 2-week supply of all prescription and non-prescription medications.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether your vaccinations are up-to-date.
  • Call your healthcare provider
    • if you have any concerns about your medical conditions, or if you get sick.
    • to find out about different ways you can connect with your healthcare provider for chronic disease management or other conditions.
  • Do not delay getting emergency care for your health problems or any health condition that requires immediate attention.
    • If you need emergency help, call 911.
    • Emergency departments have infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care for your medical condition.
  • Continue to practice everyday prevention. Wash your hands often, avoid close contact, wear a cloth face covering, cover coughs and sneezes, and clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces often.

For more information, see Groups at Higher Risk for Severe Illness.

Am I at risk for COVID-19 from mail, packages, or products?

There is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and how it spreads. Coronaviruses are thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Although the virus can survive for a short period on some surfaces, it is unlikely to be spread from domestic or international mail, products or packaging. However, it may be possible that people can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Learn more about safe handling of deliveries and mail.

Is it okay for me to donate blood?

In healthcare settings across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time.

If You or Someone You Know is Sick or Had Contact with Someone who Has COVID-19

What should I do if I get sick or someone in my house gets sick?

Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
  • Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.

However, some people may need emergency medical attention. Watch for symptoms and learn when to seek emergency medical attention.

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

What should I do if I have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if you have symptoms.

Children

What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19?

Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date. However, a few children have developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Currently, information about this syndrome is limited. CDC is working with state and local health departments to learn more about MIS-C.

How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection?

You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects, like tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

You can find additional information on preventing COVID-19 at How to Protect Yourself & Others. Additional information on how COVID-19 is spread is available at How COVID-19 Spreads.

More information on Keeping Children Healthy during the COVID-19 Outbreak is available online.

Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults?

No. The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. COVID-19 can look different in different people. For many people, being sick with COVID-19 would be a little bit like having the flu. People can get a fever, cough, or have a hard time taking deep breaths. Most people who have gotten COVID-19 have not gotten very sick. Only a small group of people who get it have had more serious problems.

CDC and partners are investigating cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19. Learn more about COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C).

Should children wear masks?

CDC recommends that everyone 2 years and older wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth in public settings when around people not living in your household, particularly where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Masks should NOT be put on babies or children younger than 2 because of the danger of suffocation. Children younger than 2 years of age are listed as an exception as well as anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community?

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. When you talk with your child, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. Talk to your children about COVID-19 and help them cope with stress.

What is multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) and who is at risk?

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. We do not yet know what causes MIS-C. However, we know that many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19. MIS-C can be serious, even deadly, but most children who were diagnosed with this condition have gotten better with medical care.

Contact your child’s doctor, nurse, or clinic right away if your child is showing symptoms of MIS-C. Seek emergency care right away if your child is showing any of these emergency warning signs of MIS-C or other concerning signs.

Can my child hang out with their friends?

The key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to practice social distancing. While school is out, children should not have in-person playdates with children from other households. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household. Some children with certain underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Make sure children practice everyday preventive behaviors, such as washing their hands often with soap and water. Remember, if children meet outside of school in groups, it can put everyone at risk.

For more information, see Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19 in Children.

How can I help my child continue learning?

  • Stay in touch with your child’s school.
    • Many schools are offering lessons online (virtual learning). Review assignments from the school, and help your child establish a reasonable pace for completing the work. You may need to assist your child with turning on devices, reading instructions, and typing answers.
  • Create a schedule and routine for learning at home, but remain flexible.
  • Consider the needs and adjustment required for your child’s age group.
    • The transition to being at home will be different for preschoolers, K-5, middle school students, and high school students. Talk to your child about expectations and how they are adjusting to being at home versus at school.
  • Look for ways to make learning fun.

For more information, see Help Children Learn at Home.

How can I help my child continue learning?

  • Stay in touch with your child’s school.
    • Many schools are offering lessons online (virtual learning). Review assignments from the school, and help your child establish a reasonable pace for completing the work. You may need to assist your child with turning on devices, reading instructions, and typing answers.
  • Create a schedule and routine for learning at home, but remain flexible.
  • Consider the needs and adjustment required for your child’s age group.
    • The transition to being at home will be different for preschoolers, K-5, middle school students, and high school students. Talk to your child about expectations and how they are adjusting to being at home versus at school.
  • Look for ways to make learning fun.

For more information, see Help Children Learn at Home.