COVID-19 Information

Anadarko, Oklahoma (Caddo County)

As of Fri, Oct 22, 2021, 11:07 AM EDT

*updated every Friday

Confirmed Cases: 5,175​​​​ (+1.5% Since last week)

Oklahoma Confirmed Cases: 637,908

Deaths: 129 (+13.1% Since last week)

Deaths: 10,545

Worldwide Statistics

Location Confirmed Cases Cases per 1,000 people Deaths
Worldwide 241,275,293 31.26 4,912,174
United States of America 44,862,573 135.54 724,605
India 34,127,450 24.73 452,811
Brazil 21,664,879 101.92 603,855
United Kingdom 8,589,741 126.53 139,031
Russia 8,131,164 55.72 227,389
Turkey 7,744,139 91.82 68,274
France 6,881,479 105.43 115,007
Iran 5,821,737 69.31 124,585
Argentina 5,274,766 116.71 115,737
Spain 4,993,295 106.8 87,082
Colombia 4,983,527 97.94 126,910
Italy 4,725,887 78.16 131,688
Germany 4,417,708 52.73 94,875
Indonesia 4,237,834 15.49 143,120
Mexico 3,762,689 29.18 284,925
Poland 2,956,207 78.11 76,300
South Africa 2,917,846 49.2 88,754
Philippines 2,735,369 24.96 40,977
Ukraine 2,701,600 61.77 62,389
Malaysia 2,407,382 74.38 28,138
Peru 2,191,171 66.46 199,928
Netherlands 2,059,534 120.2 18,273
Iraq 2,040,235 50.72 22,836
Thailand 1,821,579 26.1 18,559
Czech Republic 1,718,808 160.5 30,587
Japan 1,715,737 13.57 18,157
Canada 1,687,617 44.71 28,603
Chile 1,674,226 87.58 37,628
Bangladesh 1,566,907 9.51 27,801
Romania 1,519,532 78.99 43,487
Israel 1,320,285 152.54 8,030
Belgium 1,299,439 112.12 25,816
Pakistan 1,266,204 5.73 28,312
Sweden 1,164,402 115.3 14,985
Portugal 1,081,856 106.1 18,109
Serbia 1,070,705 122.54 9,272
Kazakhstan 1,001,369 53.33 16,835
Morocco 942,967 25.55 14,580
Cuba 940,127 83 8,114
Vietnam 873,901 8.98 21,416
Switzerland 856,027 98.91 10,744
Jordan 846,033 82.92 10,903
Hungary 841,277 87.09 30,468
Nepal 807,522 27.71 11,326
Austria 780,611 86.67 10,968
United Arab Emirates 738,924 74.71 2,124
Tunisia 711,164 60.17 25,121
Greece 704,211 67.56 15,485
Georgia 680,182 170.51 9,617
Lebanon 635,447 93.1 8,438
Guatemala 589,986 32.93 14,436
Belarus 577,932 61.16 4,449
Bulgaria 555,077 79.89 22,719
Costa Rica 553,661 108.69 6,880
Saudi Arabia 548,065 15.74 8,770
Sri Lanka 533,305 24.91 13,543
Ecuador 514,087 29.14 32,937
Azerbaijan 507,857 50.09 6,809
Bolivia 507,683 43.49 18,883
Myanmar 491,584 9.03 18,465
Panama 470,598 109.07 7,297
Paraguay 460,582 64.57 16,228
Slovakia 446,305 81.75 12,883
Croatia 436,189 106.25 8,968
Ireland 421,234 85.31 5,369
Kuwait 412,424 96.57 2,458
Venezuela 395,223 13.9 4,748
Uruguay 391,358 112.66 6,069
Lithuania 379,438 139.38 5,544
Honduras 373,206 37.68 10,148
Dominican Republic 373,040 34.39 4,095
Denmark 371,286 64.1 2,694
Ethiopia 360,503 3.14 6,287
Libya 351,756 51.19 4,945
South Korea 347,529 6.78 2,709
Mongolia 335,681 102.4 1,518
Moldova 321,682 79.74 7,346
Egypt 321,084 3.14 18,105
Slovenia 312,316 150.23 4,998
Oman 304,101 59.55 4,107
Armenia 288,906 97.5 5,902
Bahrain 276,336 162.4 1,392
Kenya 252,308 4.69 5,238
Bosnia and Herzegovina 246,555 75.15 11,253
Qatar 238,165 82.67 608
Nigeria 209,713 1.02 2,840
Zambia 209,571 11.4 3,658
Algeria 205,529 4.69 5,878
North Macedonia 198,156 95.11 6,998
Norway 197,499 36.43 893
Latvia 194,256 102.99 2,967
Botswana 184,051 78.27 2,389
Puerto Rico 183,628 64.19 3,213
Uzbekistan 182,421 5.45 1,297
Kyrgyzstan 180,223 27.62 2,643
Albania 179,463 62.36 2,849
Estonia 177,287 133.65 1,444
Singapore 158,587 27.11 264
Afghanistan 155,859 4 7,247
Finland 152,707 27.56 1,132
Mozambique 151,157 4.84 1,927
Australia 149,398 5.86 1,577
Montenegro 139,045 221.39 2,042
Zimbabwe 132,487 8.91 4,660
Ghana 129,592 4.17 1,169
Namibia 128,395 50.53 3,543
Uganda 125,426 2.74 3,192
People’s Republic of China 125,351 0.09 5,695
Cyprus 122,852 101.75 566
Cambodia 117,201 7.01 2,693
El Salvador 110,188 16.99 3,520
Cameroon 100,289 3.78 1,600
Rwanda 99,250 7.66 1,314
Jamaica 87,723 29.62 2,129
Maldives 86,419 159.87 239
Luxembourg 80,331 128.33 842
Senegal 73,875 4.41 1,873
Democratic Republic of the Congo 73,810 0.82 1,330
Angola 63,340 1.93 1,682
Malawi 61,738 3.23 2,296
Ivory Coast 61,113 2.32 689
Trinidad and Tobago 54,405 38.87 1,613
Guadeloupe 54,095 135.19 809
Réunion 54,024 60.34 370
Fiji 51,909 57.91 661
Suriname 47,284 80.6 1,040
Swaziland 46,376 39.97 1,236
French Polynesia 45,506 162 635
French Guiana 43,690 146.28 297
Madagascar 43,622 1.58 960
Martinique 42,748 113.91 670
Syria 40,294 2.3 2,457
Sudan 40,084 0.91 2,990
Cape Verde 38,082 68.49 347
Malta 37,508 84.95 459
Mauritania 36,783 7.91 791
Guyana 34,608 44 877
Gabon 34,281 15.4 219
Laos 33,606 4.62 47
Guinea 30,605 2.33 385
Tanzania 26,034 0.44 724
Togo 25,936 3.13 240
Papua New Guinea 25,769 2.88 312
Belize 24,768 62.29 466
Benin 24,560 2.03 161
Haiti 23,406 2.05 658
The Bahamas 22,092 56.18 626
Seychelles 22,071 224.44 114
Lesotho 21,557 10.06 655
Somalia 21,269 1.34 1,180
Mayotte 20,464 75.01 182
Burundi 19,867 1.67 14
East Timor 19,749 14.98 120
Tajikistan 17,484 1.83 125
Curaçao 16,955 103.32 172
Mauritius 16,951 13.33 145
Aruba 15,746 147.48 170
Mali 15,698 0.78 558
Andorra 15,382 199.08 130
Burkina Faso 14,793 0.71 214
Guam 14,256 84.46 226
Barbados 13,553 47.16 120
Djibouti 13,423 13.59 181
Equatorial Guinea 13,097 9.34 163
Iceland 12,775 37.44 33
Nicaragua 12,549 1.89 207
Saint Lucia 12,280 66.87 237
South Sudan 12,270 1.1 133
Central African Republic 11,478 2.38 100
Brunei 11,386 26.03 51
Jersey 10,537 60.61 80
New Caledonia 10,213 35.77 245
The Gambia 9,946 4.12 339
Yemen 9,596 0.32 1,821
Isle of Man 8,817 103.69 56
United States Virgin Islands 7,099 67.98 78
Eritrea 6,780 1.91 45
Sierra Leone 6,397 0.8 121
Niger 6,203 0.26 205
Guinea-Bissau 6,131 3.12 141
Liberia 5,811 1.15 287
Gibraltar 5,803 172.24 98
Grenada 5,776 51.33 193
Bermuda 5,593 89.81 95
San Marino 5,490 161.77 91
Chad 5,069 0.31 174
New Zealand 4,956 1.03 28
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 4,637 41.79 54
Sint Maarten 4,456 103.91 74
Dominica 4,366 60.65 30
Comoros 4,197 4.83 147
Antigua and Barbuda 3,939 40.22 97
Saint Martin 3,888 100.57 37
São Tomé and Príncipe 3,687 16.82 56
Liechtenstein 3,619 94.89 58
Monaco 3,382 86.18 35
Turks and Caicos Islands 2,936 75.83 23
British Virgin Islands 2,725 90.12 37
Bhutan 2,617 3.39 3
Saint Kitts and Nevis 2,589 48.67 21
Bonaire 2,314 88.25 19
Guernsey 1,930 11.1 22
Saint-Barthélemy 1,659 167.83 4
Faroe Islands 1,350 27.63 2
Cayman Islands 1,095 16.66 2
Greenland 700 12.33 –*
Anguilla 698 46.53 1
Wallis and Futuna 454 40.37 7
Northern Mariana Islands 289 5.02 3
Falkland Islands 69 19.81 –*
Montserrat 41 8.2 1
Saint Pierre and Miquelon 32 5.52 –*
Solomon Islands 20 0.03 –*
Palau 8 0.44 –*
Marshall Islands 4 0.07 –*
Vanuatu 3 0.01 –*
Samoa 1 0.01 –*

State opens COVID-19 vaccine to Oklahomans in Phase 3 groups

Child care workers, higher and Career Tech education and critical business infrastructure among Oklahomans now available to schedule appointments 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 8, 2021

Contact: Hayden Benge

comms@health.ok.gov

(cell) 918-899-8098

OKLAHOMA CITY — The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) announced today that starting March 9, the COVID-19 vaccine will be available to Oklahomans registered in Phase 3 of the state’s vaccine distribution plan: Staff and students in educational settings outside of PreK-12 and critical infrastructure personnel. 

This comes on the heels of opening vaccine appointments to all Oklahomans in Phase 2 last week. Oklahoma has consistently ranked among the top states in vaccine distribution and has built a streamlined infrastructure to get vaccine to Oklahomans within seven days of receipt.

“Thanks to increasing vaccine supply and the fluidity of our state distribution plan, we’re excited to open vaccine appointments to our next major priority groups. This also means different counties may be in different stages in the roll out based on their population and needs,” said Keith Reed, Deputy Commissioner of Health. “We worked quickly through our teachers and beat by over a week our goal to have every teacher have the opportunity to be vaccinated by Spring Break. That is giving us an opportunity to open to additional groups quicker than anticipated.”

“Phases 1, 2 and 3 cover nearly 3.5 million Oklahomans — so odds are, you are currently eligible for the vaccine. Please register in the Vaccine Scheduler Portal or talk to your medical provider to check your eligibility. If you’re currently eligible, we are encouraging you to sign up for the first available and convenient appointment for you. Getting a vaccine will not only protect you and others, but it will also help us slow the rate of communal transmission and bring us one step closer to being together again.”

Eligibility in each of these groups is outlined in Oklahoma’s distribution plan as the following:

·        Teachers, students aged 18 and older, residents and administrative staff in educational settings outside PreK-12, including but not limited to:

o   Childcare facilities

o   Early childhood facilities

o   Colleges and universities

o   Career and vocational technology centers

o   Other post-secondary institutions

o   Estimated Population: 933,000

·        Critical infrastructure personnel as specified in the Governor’s 3rd executive order who are at high risk of exposure to, transmission of, and morbidity and mortality resulting from COVID infection.

o   Estimated Population: 1,500,000

 

Oklahomans among the new priority groups are encouraged to register through the state’s Vaccine Scheduler Portal if they haven’t done so already. After registration, they will see available appointments on the portal starting March 9. As a reminder, vaccine appointments are also available through many other local pandemic providers across the state.

“Now that we’ve taken steps to protect our most at-risk populations, it’s time for Oklahomans to be proactive and get their COVID-19 vaccines,” said Commissioner Frye. “Phase 3 includes groups of people that are considerably younger than those outlined in the previous priority groups. Supply is no longer a major limitation in our efforts to administer the vaccine. I encourage all Oklahomans, no matter how old or how healthy you are to schedule a vaccine appointment as soon as it’s available to you. It’s the best thing you can do to protect yourself and those around you.”

The vaccine is available at no cost to all eligible groups in phase 1, 2 and 3. To schedule an appointment to receive the COVID-19 vaccine or to register to receive a notification when you will be eligible, please use the Vaccine Scheduler Portal here: https://vaccinate.oklahoma.gov/.

Coronavirus Pandemic Whole-of-America Response

Federal Funding for Additional COVID-19 Support

  • As of March 8, FEMA has obligated $63.5 billion for the COVID-19 response. Of that $4.3 billion has been obligated for expenses to support community vaccination centers throughout the country at 100% cost share. A balance of $11.7 billion remains in the Disaster Relief Fund to support continued response to the pandemic including expanded vaccination efforts as well as personal protective equipment, alternative care sites and durable medical equipment.
  • As of 4, obligations for COVID-19 support include:
    • Funeral Expenses: $145.4 million
    • Lost Wages: Almost $40 billion for those who were unemployed due to COVID-19 through 27, 2020.
    • National Guard: $3.8 billion
    • PPE including medical supplies and pharmaceuticals: $5.2 billion
    • Public Assistance Emergency Protective Measures (Non-PPE): $7 billion
    • Temporary Medical Facilities including medical personnel, mortuary and ambulance services: over $2.4 billion
    • Commodities: (includes meals and water): $35.4 million
    • Crisis Counseling: $403.3 million
  • All 50 states, five territories, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, the Navajo Nation and Washington C., have been approved for major disaster declaration assistance due to COVID-19.
  • FEMA is working directly with 91 tribes as a result of COVID Tribal governments may choose to be a subrecipient or recipient under a state receiving FEMA assistance, or seek their own Presidential declaration through FEMA. Of the 91 tribal recipients, two tribes, the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Navajo Nation, received their own major disaster declaration.

 

Personal Protective Equipment and Ventilators

  • As of March 5, FEMA, HHS and the private sector coordinated delivery of or are currently shipping: over 4 million N95 masks, over 2.2 billion surgical and procedural masks, over

119.5 million eye and face shields, over 965.5 million gowns and coveralls and over 48.2 billion gloves.

  • As of March 4, the federal government has approximately 152,792 total ventilators available in the Strategic National

 

Testing

  • As of March 7, CDC, state, local public health labs and other laboratories have tested more than

342.4 million samples.

 

  • HHS has established a public-private partnership with pharmacy and retail companies to accelerate
    • As of March 8, Under the CBTS public-private partnership, there are currently 6,211 live sites in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico are conducting testing.
    • Over 8 million samples were processed at public-private partnership testing sites.

 

Federal Personnel

  • As of March 7, 3,082 interagency vaccinators and clinical staff have deployed to support vaccination centers throughout the
  • As of March 7, 29,545 National Guard troops have activated, 2,257 of which are
  • As of March 8, the number of FEMA personnel deployed to support the COVID-19 response is (including the Surge Capacity Force, local hires and FEMA Corps) is 3,963.
  • As of March 1, 8,535 CDC personnel are supporting the outbreak

 

Emergency Alerts

  • As of March 8, 132 agencies across 31 states, the District of Columbia, three tribes and one U.S. territory have used FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to send a total of 579 alerts containing information on COVID-19 to cell phones and other wireless devices via the Wireless Emergency Alert system, and 105 alerts to radios/televisions via Emergency Alert
State/Territory Award Granted (weeks 1-3) Award Granted (week 4) Award Granted (week 5) Award Granted (week 6)
Alabama $173,400,000 $54,700,000 $49,200,000 $52,800,000
Alaska $40,700,000 $12,600,000 $11,400,000 $7,400,000
Arizona * $498,100,000   $122,600,000 $446,200,000
Arkansas $79,400,000 $24,800,000 $24,000,000 $23,700,000
California $4,510,000,000 $1,430,000,000 $1,490,000,000 $1,510,000,000
CNMI $7,700,000      
Colorado $264,500,000 $97,900,000 $97,500,000 $94,200,000
Connecticut $225,600,000 $75,000,000 $75,000,000 $70,500,000
Delaware $46,800,000 $13,700,000 $8,700,000 $8,300,000
District of Columbia $74,700,000 $23,600,000 $24,100,000 $23,600,000
Florida $918,200,000 $299,200,000    
Georgia $818,500,000 $277,300,000 $278,900,000 $281,200,000
Guam $22,600,000 $7,500,000 $7,500,000 $7,500,000
Hawaii $193,900,000 $53,400,000 $53,400,000 $70,300,000
Idaho $27,000,000 $10,300,000 $10,000,000  
Illinois $723,300,000 $216,000,000 $206,400,000 $203,400,000
Indiana $212,600,000 $64,000,000 $78,000,000 $96,300,000
Iowa $110,400,000 $35,500,000 $35,200,000 $35,000,000
Kansas $63,400,000 $19,600,000 $18,400,000 $33,450,000
Kentucky $104,500,000 $37,200,000 $37,200,000 $37,200,000
Louisiana $372,100,000 $123,600,000 $92,700,000 $92,700,000
Maine $74,100,000 $21,200,000 $20,500,000 $20,100,000
Maryland $431,600,000 $143,700,000 $143,700,000 $143,700,000
Massachusetts $644,600,000 $209,900,000 $205,500,000 $198,700,000
Michigan $934,800,000 $292,900,000 $292,900,000 $292,900,000
Minnesota $299,500,000 $99,800,000 $99,800,000 $99,800,000
Mississippi $146,000,000 $31,200,000 $31,900,000 $38,100,000
Missouri * $247,900,000     $118,800,000
Montana $26,800,000 $6,800,000 $7,800,000 $7,300,000
Nebraska $38,200,000 $18,900,000 $16,900,000 $16,400,000

 

Nevada $225,500,000 $71,300,000 $67,800,000 $88,500,000
New Hampshire $50,300,000 $17,900,000 $17,000,000 $16,600,000
New Jersey $733,700,000 $236,800,000 $270,200,000 $238,000,000
New Mexico $119,100,000 $38,700,000 $38,200,000 $37,000,000
New York $2,120,000,000 $723,500,000 $678,600,000 $682,000,000
North Carolina $375,600,000 $119,700,000 $117,000,000 $106,500,000
North Dakota $14,900,000 $5,300,000 $5,300,000 $9,700,000
Ohio $717,900,000 $231,000,000 $234,900,000 $224,100,000
Oklahoma $151,300,000 $50,400,000 $50,400,000 $50,400,000
Oregon $223,300,000 $68,100,000 $65,400,000 $64,700,000
Pennsylvania $1,490,000,000 $467,400,000 $441,200,000 $428,700,000
Puerto Rico $339,900,000 $109,700,000 $108,000,000 $104,700,000
Rhode Island $101,000,000 $33,700,000 $29,200,000 $29,100,000
South Carolina $185,900,000 $55,700,000 $52,300,000 $45,700,000
Tennessee $236,000,000 $78,500,000 $78,600,000 $78,600,000
Texas $1,380,000,000 $707,300,000 $568,500,000 $568,500,000
US Virgin Islands $7,400,000      
Utah $55,200,000 $14,100,000 $12,300,000 $10,400,000
Vermont $39,400,000 $12,000,000 $11,200,000 $11,200,000
Virginia $378,700,000 $116,000,000 $112,800,000 $113,300,000
Washington $462,200,000 $164,000,000 $169,700,000 $172,900,000
West Virginia $68,300,000 $17,800,000 $17,000,000 $13,200,000
Wisconsin $116,900,000 $35,700,000 $36,600,000 $40,100,000
Wyoming $8,500,000 $2,700,000 $2,500,000 $2,400,000
54 $21,931,900,000 $7,077,600,000 $6,723,900,000 $7,165,850,000
* initial award includes supplemental weeks
  TOTAL $42,899,250,000    

** week 6 award includes

supplemental weeks 1-5

 

Symptoms

Symptoms of Coronavirus

What you need to know

  • Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms.
  • Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Watch for symptoms

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as we learn more about COVID-19.

When to seek emergency medical attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

What is the difference between Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19?

Influenza (Flu) and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone, and testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Flu and COVID-19 share many characteristics, but there are some key differences between the two.

While more is learned every day, there is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and the virus that causes it. This page compares COVID-19 and flu, given the best available information to date.

 

 

Testing

COVID-19 Testing Overview

Find out who should get tested. Protect yourself and others. Wear a mask, wash hands often, stay 6 ft from others.

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • A viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
  • An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection.

Considerations for who should get tested

  • People who have symptoms of COVID-19
  • People who have had close contact (within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes) with someone with confirmed COVID-19
  • People who have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, localexternal icon or state ​health department

Not everyone needs to be tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

How to get tested for current COVID-19 infection

  • You can visit your state or localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.

Results

  • If you test positive, know what protective steps to prevent others from getting sick.
  • If you test negative, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. Continue to take steps to protect yourself.

Test for Current Infection

Protect yourself and others. Wear a mask, wash hands often, stay 6 ft from others.

Considerations for who should get tested

  • People who have symptoms of COVID-19
  • People who have had close contact (within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes) with someone with confirmed COVID-19
  • People who have been asked or referred  to get testing by their healthcare provider, localexternal icon or state health department.

Not everyone needs to be tested. If you do get tested, you should self-quarantine/isolate at home pending test results and follow the advice of your health care provider or a public health professional.

Take steps to protect yourself

Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

How to get a viral test

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19.  The time it takes to process these tests can vary.

  • You can visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. Find out what to do if you are sick.

What to do after a viral test

To get your test result, please check with the group that performed your test, such as your healthcare provider or health department. How long it will take to get your test results depends on the test used.

  • If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick.
    • Most people have mild COVID-19 illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.
  • If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. This does not mean you will not get sick:
    • A negative test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing or that your sample was collected too early in your infection.
    • You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and then get infected and spread the virus to others.
    • If you have symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

Test for Past Infection

Antibody tests check your blood by looking for antibodies, which may tell you if you had a past infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. Antibodies are proteins that help fight off infections and can provide protection against getting that disease again (immunity). Antibodies are disease specific. For example, measles antibodies will protect you from getting measles if you are exposed to it again, but they won’t protect you from getting mumps if you are exposed to mumps.

Except in instances in which viral testing is delayed, antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. To see if you are currently infected, you need a viral test. Viral tests identify the virus in samples from your respiratory system, such as a swab from the inside of your nose.

If you test positive or negative for COVID-19 on a viral or an antibody test, you still should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

We do not know yet if people who recover from COVID-19 can get infected again.  Scientists are working to understand this.

How to get an antibody test

Guidance on Interpreting COVID-19 Test Resultspdf iconexternal icon: A guide for understanding test results and determining what actions to take.

Decisions about testing are made by state or localexternal icon health departments or healthcare providers.​

Antibody tests for COVID-19 are available through healthcare providers and laboratories. Check with your healthcare provider to see if they offer antibody tests and whether you should get one.

What do your results mean?

If you test positive

  • A positive test result shows you may have antibodies from an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. However, there is a chance a positive result means that you have antibodies from an infection with a virus from the same family of viruses (called coronaviruses), such as the one that causes the common cold.
  • Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 may provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies may provide or how long this protection may last.
  • Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means. Your provider may suggest you take a second type of antibody test to see if the first test was accurate.
  • You should continue to protect yourself and others since you could get infected with the virus again.
    • If you work in a job where you wear personal protective equipment (PPE), continue wearing PPE.
  • You may test positive for antibodies even if you have never had symptoms of COVID-19. This can happen if you had an infection without symptoms, which is called an asymptomatic infection.

If you test negative

  • You may not have ever had COVID-19. Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means.
  • You could still have a current infection.
    • The test may be negative because it typically takes 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies. It’s possible you could still get sick if you have been exposed to the virus recently. This means you could still spread the virus.
    • Some people may take even longer to develop antibodies, and some people who are infected may not ever develop antibodies.

If you get symptoms after the antibody test, you might need another test called a viral test​.

Regardless of whether you test positive or negative, the results do not confirm whether or not you are able to spread the virus that causes COVID-19. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others.

Learn more about using antibody tests to look for past infection.

Contact Tracing

Contact tracing is key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 and helps protect you, your family, and your community.

Contact tracing slows the spread of COVID-19 by

  • Letting people know they may have been exposed to COVID-19 and should monitor their health for signs and symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Helping people who may have been exposed to COVID-19 get tested.
  • Asking people to self-isolate if they have COVID-19 or self-quarantine if they are a close contact.
During contact tracing, the health department staff will not ask you for
  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Contact tracing for COVID-19 works best with everyday preventive actions

You can take everyday preventive actions to slow the spread of COVID-19. Doing so is especially important until a vaccine or better treatments become widely available.

What you can expect to happen

If you were around someone diagnosed with COVID-19

If you were around someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19, someone from the health department may call you.

Stay home away from others:

  • Stay away from others, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, such as older adults and people with other medical conditions, if possible.
  • If you have been around someone with COVID-19, stay home away from others for 14 days (self-quarantine) after your last contact with that person and monitor your health.
  • If you have a fever, cough or other symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and away from others (except to get medical care or testing, if recommended).
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-quarantine, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

For COVID-19, a close contact is anyone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes. An infected person can spread COVID-19 starting from 48 hours (or 2 days) before the person had any symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19.

Monitor your health:

  • Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19. Remember, symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19.

Answer the phone call from the health department. If someone from the health department calls you, answer the call to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in your community.

  • Discussions with health department staff are confidential. This means that your personal and medical information will be kept private and only shared with those who may need to know, like your health care provider.
  • Your name will not be shared with those you came in contact with. The health department will only notify people you were in close contact with (within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes) that they might have been exposed to COVID-19.

Tell the health department staff if you develop symptoms of COVID-19. If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

The health department staff will not ask you for

  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Did you know? Health department staff may use case management or exposure notification digital tools to help with contact tracing. Learn more about these types of digital tools.

If you are waiting for a COVID-19 test result

If you think you may have COVID-19 and are waiting for a COVID-19 test result, stay home and monitor your health to protect your friends, family and others from possibly getting COVID-19.

Stay home away from others:

  • Stay away from others while waiting for your COVID-19 test result, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19, such as older adults and people with other medical conditions, if possible.
  • If you have been around someone with COVID-19, stay home and away from others for 14 days (self-quarantine) after your last contact with that person and monitor your health.
  • If you have a fever, cough or other symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and away from others (except to get medical care).
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-quarantine, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

Monitor your health:

  • Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19. Remember, symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to COVID-19.

Think about the people you have recently been around. While you wait for your COVID-19 test result, think about everyone you have been around recently. This will be important information to have available.  If your test is positive, someone from the health department may call you to check on your health, discuss who you have been around, and ask where you spent time while you may have been able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Follow your health department’s guidelines when you receive your COVID-19 test result.

  • Positive test, whether or not you have symptoms
  • Negative test and you do not have symptoms
    • If your test is negative and you do not have symptoms, continue to stay away from others (self-quarantine) for 14 days after your last exposure to COVID-19 and follow all recommendations from the health department.
    • A negative result before the end of your quarantine period does not rule out possible infection.
    • You do not need a repeat test unless you develop symptoms, or if you require a test to return to work.
  • Negative test and you have symptoms
    • If your test is negative and you have symptoms you should continue to stay away from others (self-quarantine) for 14 days after your last exposure to COVID-19 and follow all recommendations from the health department. A second test and additional medical consultation may be needed if your symptoms do not improve.
    • If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19

If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, someone from the health department may call you to

  • Check on your health,
  • Discuss who you have been around, and
  • Ask where you have spent time while you may have been able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Discussions with health department staff are confidential. This means that your name and personal and medical information will be kept private and only shared with those who may need to know, like your health care provider.

  • Your name will not be shared with those you came in contact with. The health department will only notify people you were in close contact with (within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes) that they might have been exposed to COVID-19.

The health department staff will not ask you for

  • Money
  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information
  • Salary information
  • Credit card numbers

Any information you share with health department staff is CONFIDENTIAL. This means that your name and personal and medical information will be kept private.

Stay home away from others:

You will be asked to stay at home and self-isolate, if you are not doing so already.

  • Stay home away from others except to get medical care.
    • Monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign(including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.
    • Stay in a separate room from other household members and use a separate bathroom, if possible.
    • Avoid contact with other household members and pets.
    • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils.
    • Wear a mask when around other people, if able.
      Learn more about what to do if you are sick.
  • Self-isolation helps slow the spread of COVID-19 and can help keep your family, friends, neighbors, and others you may come in contact with healthy.
  • If you need support or assistance while in self-isolation, your health department or community organizations may be able to provide assistance.

Monitor your health: If your symptoms worsen or become severe, you should seek emergency medical care.

You can be around others after

  • 24 hours with no fever, and
  • Respiratory symptoms have improved (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), and
  • 10 days since symptoms first appeared.

Frequently Asked Questions

Bedtime Stress & COVID: 19 Wellness Tools For Kids

Mental Health and Young Minds

Children have had all traditional forms of socialization ripped away thanks to social distancing and quarantine. Schedules have been interrupted, once set plans are now thrown in disarray, and socialization opportunities are drastically reduced. 

It has been especially difficult for older children, who are old enough to understand that the world outside is not safe. With sickness running rampant and no solution readily available to fight it, life today resembles something of a sci-fi flick that children are more likely to watch on TV screens in their living room and not running amuck outside the front door.

There is no doubt that COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the U.S., but experts say that we won’t know the full effects of COVID on children’s mental health until much later. 

Now, more than ever, children need to find that extra security and comfort so they can sleep soundly. With no lack of worry to fill their heads, you can take a proactive stance and transform bedtime into a more fun, relaxing, and soothing time garnering the help of today’s top-rated bedtime tools.  

Mental Wellness Tools for Bedtime During COVID 

Meditation and Mindfulness Apps

These are some of the best apps to use for meditation and mindfulness at bedtime. 

  1. Smiling Mind (free)

Smiling Mind is a mindfulness app with over 5 million users. It is the work of an Australian not-for-profit created by psychologists and educators, offering specialized programs for home, work and school. It’s completely free with programs for both adults and children to improve stress, sleep, attention and concentration. It focuses on specific areas of focus, such as wellbeing, relationships, performance, sports and even diet for a well-rounded, comprehensive app designed to improve your lifestyle, no matter your age. There is also a new Family Tool Kit for you to use that was established in cooperation with MediBank.

  1. Mindful Powers

This is an app created specifically for kids, ideally ages 7-10. It uses a holistic approach to social-economical learning in order to improve early and middle childhood development. Developers have created an interactive, play-based version of a child’s diary that places a special focus on emotions and feelings from day to day. Your child will expand skills and knowledge through play while decreasing stress and anxiety – both important benefits in today’s world. There’s a free trial, and then if you like it, it’s $4.99 a month to continue with a 101-story pack.

  1. Headspace for Kids

This app specializes in meditation that is specifically designed for kids. In addition to its regular featured content, there is a new meditation that is launched each day, so you never tire of old content. The meditation guide also includes support and advice from a real-life former Monk who can work with you to take your skills to the next level. There are both student and family plans available, and you can try out the free trial. There is a two week trial for the annual plan, which costs $69.99, or you can opt for the monthly plan with a one week trial before changing to $12.99 per month.

  1. Calm

You may have already seen Calm from the commercials on TV, and it’s popular for good reason, based on over 700,000 5-star reviews. This is an app designed to improve your sleep, meditation and relaxation with soothing music and videos to guide stretching and movement. There are masterclass audio classes taught by expert instructors with additional nature scenes and soundtracks that you can use at work or when studying. There is also a huge library of Sleep Stories with celebrity narrators (think Matthew McConaughey) and new content added each week. You can enjoy a free one-week trial, and then you can decide whether to purchase a lifetime subscription for $399.99 or choose the regular annual membership for $69.99 that renews each year.

  1. Mindfulness for Children

Created by parents for parents, Guided meditation for the entire family, including your children as young as four years old. There are breathing exercises designed to help children handle stress by lowering their anxiety and improving their focus through meditation. It also helps kids maintain a healthy emotional balance while learning to get rid of emotional stress, with special soundtracks to help your little ones sleep. We also love how hands-on the creators are, taking the time to personally respond to inquiries and issues expressed in customer reviews. It’s a simple $2.99 for the app for an affordable solution to bedtime anxiety.

  1. Sleep Meditations for Kids

This app offers a different take on children’s meditation with gorgeous illustrations and 13-minute bedtime meditations with seven more available for purchase. Sleep Meditations for Kids is created by a London-based Montessori teacher named Christiane Kerr, who also founded Calm for Kids in 1999. She guides you through all of the meditations, speaking in a calm voice that many children find very soothing. The app itself is free, and you have the option to purchase extra meditation sessions at $2.99 each via in-app purchases. 

  1. Children’s Sleep Meditations

This is another app again dedicated to sleep meditation for children, but this one comes courtesy of Diviniti Publishing Ltd. This one includes five bedtime meditations with many more available to buy directly from the app. It focuses on meditation and mindfulness with professionally-produced recordings that you can use as background music to relax or with guided meditation using scripted stories. There is also a special Children’s Breathe feature that allows your kids to create and practice positive breathing habits. The app is free to download with in-app purchases available at $2.99 each.

While many parents enjoy these apps for their convenience and accessibility, there are also many parents who prefer to keep technology out of their children’s bedrooms. In these cases, it is a simple matter to restructure the delivery of child meditation by using written scripts. 

Bouns: Written Meditations

Written meditation scripts are prepared in advance and can be read not only by a parent or guardian but also siblings, relatives and friends who can all benefit from the positive effects of meditation and relaxation. These are a great option for those looking to keep tech out of a child’s bedroom, or for kids who find a familiar voice more soothing than an app. To peruse some options for your next guided meditation, check out these scripts from Greenchild Magazine.

Bedtime Apps

In addition to meditation, you can also use these bedtime apps to improve your family’s sleep.

  1. Portal app (free)

Portal doesn’t just improve your sleep and relaxation; it helps your focus, too, with 19 total portals (5 come unlocked, the rest you have to purchase one by one). This app creates an immersive experience that pairs 3D soundscapes and HD visuals with Philips Hue smart lighting. Soundscapes are the work of an Emmy-winning recordist and run the gamut from the soothing waves of the Pacific to the tundras of Africa.  There is also a built-in timer and an awesome focused task feature that will come especially handy when you are concentrating. Recommended for ages four and up, it’s free to download and then $5.99 to access the locked portals.

  1. Moshi (free)

Moshi definitely gets the award for the most accessible app, because there is no internet needed to download it. More than 45 hours of original content that includes stories narrated by Patrick Steward and Goldie Hawn. Enjoy stories, music, soundtracks and meditations all designed to eliminate anxiety and stress while helping children relax and sleep better. It is rated for everyone and is free with in-app purchases. 

  1. Nighty Night bedtime book

This app is designed to be a nightly sleep ritual for young children ages one to four years old in order to help induce sleepiness. Each night, children get to put all of the 13 interactive animals to sleep and turn out the lights for everyone to go to bed. To make it more realistic, you can even switch between winter and summer. Created by Oscar-nominee Heidi Wittlinger, this app offers a fun story with interactive sounds. It’s $3.99 to purchase the app with additional in-app purchases.

  1. Novel Effect (free)

Approved by the AASL, this is voice-based, story-driven content that brings your favorite stories to life. It uses character voices, music and sound effects for a fully immersive experience unlike any other. Designed with the entire family in mind, you can choose your own story and control how it ends. Kids will love that they can take the reins and decide what happens next. Recommended for children ages four and up, this is a free app with additional in-app purchases that range from under a dollar to about $25, depending on which option you choose. 

  1. Daniel Tiger Day and Night

This imaginative app is brought to you by Daniel Tiger from PBS Kids. In the morning, your kids can use the app to help Daniel prepare for the day, and when the sun goes down, the app welcomes bedtime with sing-alongs and eight different games. There’s also a helpful timer that’s set to music and will help establish regular routines. It’s $2.99 to purchase and recommended for children ages four and up.

Kid’s Yoga Apps

Yoga isn’t just for adults. Yoga and mindfulness apps have been shown to have a significant impact on a child’s physician and mental health, particularly for children ages six to twelve.

If you have Amazon Prime, you can get free yoga videos for kids, including these top picks.

  1. Yoga for Kids (free)

Rated for everyone, this is a great introduction to yoga for children with a tutorial that includes all of the basic poses, to include Bow Pose, Bridge Pose and Cat Pose. It’s designed to boost confidence and increase cooperation, communication and compassion skills through meditation and relaxing sounds. The free version does include ads, but you can purchase an ad-free option for uninterrupted service.

  1. Yoga for Kids and Family fitness (free)

This app places a specific focus on building mental strength, in addition to physical strength, with all the important, kid-friendly yoga poses. It also includes tips for a healthy diet with tons of recipes that kids will enjoy making. The app is free with the option to go ad-free with a paid version, and it is rated E for everyone, so the whole family can take part.  

  1. GoGo Yoga for Kids

Dive deep into the world of yoga with this app’s user-friendly and kid-friendly design. The kids yoga challenge app has 40 progressive poses that are rated based on difficulty. We also love the positive mantras designed to protect mental health and boost confidence. From yoga books to pose cards, there’s everything you need to keep yoga a fresh activity for your family. This is rated for ages four and up and is $1.99 to purchase.

White Noise Apps

Sometimes, your child just needs the soothing, rhythmic sounds of ambient noise. These white noise apps all help millions of children fall asleep each night. 

  1. Sleepy Sounds (free)

Previously known as Sleepy Baby, this is a free app with optional in-app purchases. In addition to basic white noise, you have the option to choose from a library of beautiful lullabies to sing your baby to sleep. There are also nature sounds with built-in timers, so you can choose how long the audio plays before it shuts off. 

  1. Baby Sleep Sounds

This app features soothing sounds like rhythmic shushing and lullabies with the ability to use premixed sounds, or you can create your own. The design incorporates ambient lighting for extra comfort, and with no internet connection required, this app even works in airplane mode. There is no subscription required, and you can benefit from the free download with the option to upgrade to your choice of paid add-ons running from $1.99 to $8.99. 

  1. Lullaby for Babies (free)

Designed to soothe crying children, this music-based app features calming lullabies and sounds for bedtime. Rated for everyone, it includes a built-in library full of lullabies and relaxing sounds to help your child fall asleep. You can set up specific songs to play at certain times, or you can create your own playlist with your favorite songs ready to go. Like most others, this is a free app with optional in-app purchases. 

  1. Lightning Bug sleep clock (free)

Forget your old alarm clock, because this app may change the way you sleep, no matter how old you are. It uses everyday sounds to create familiar, ambient noise to relax you. With its white noise mixer of ambient sounds, there are nearly 200 sound loops that include things like ocean waves, city noise and meditation bells. Visually, there are soothing backgrounds, and there is also an integrated digital alarm clock with a soothing and enjoyable soundtrack.

Other Ways to Facilitate Quiet Time

There are traditional solutions outside of the digital realm that have proven to be very helpful in reinforcing quiet time with young children. 

Journaling

Journaling is a great way for children to release stress and worries before bedtime. The idea is that by writing down their negative feelings, they are then free to sleep peacefully without worry because they have already purged any negative emotions into their journal.

Don’t want to spend $10 on a special mindfulness journal? Take a regular spiral notebook and write prompts for your child to follow:

  • I’m grateful for…
  • This made me happy today…
  • I’m looking forward to… 
  • One person I really love…

“I Spy” Jar

An “I Spy” jar is a fun, creative DIY solution for bedtime anxiety. 

Creating your “I Spy” jar is a fun activity you can do together, filling an empty jar with things like rice and lentils in addition to glow-in-the-dark alphabet beads. Even if your child isn’t sleepy at bedtime, the soothing activity of searching out letters in the dark will be enough to keep your child entertained until rest comes. 

Sensory Bag

Sensory bags are designed to stimulate not only the senses but also your child’s cognitive abilities. It can distract them from worrisome thoughts and bad dreams by clearing the mind and captivating them with the contents of the bag. Bags are designed to be fun to touch, feeling slimy, soft or squishy to capture your child’s attention until those eyelids begin to grow heavy. 

Blowing Bubbles/Pinwheels

There’s a reason why blowing bubbles or pinwheels is such a popular kids activity. This simple exercise is an easy way to slow and steady your child’s breathing while distracting them with the fun of blowing bubbles. As they focus on the bubbles moving and changing, the simplicity of the activity, combined with steady breathing, can prepare them for sleep. 

Tricks for a Soothing Sleep Environment

While meditation and mindfulness apps can help prepare you for sleep, it’s also important to have a comfortable, safe place to rest. These are some ways to prepare your child’s space for a more soothing, calming environment.

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy has skyrocketed in popularity in recent years, with experts and users alike proclaiming the calming effects of lavender and sweet orange to promote better, restful sleep. Today, diffusers come in all shapes, sizes and colors, so you can choose a fun design for your child’s room. 

Bedding

It is hard to sleep when you don’t have a comfortable bed to enjoy. The growing bodies of children especially need a comfortable platform to sleep on, so if your child is having trouble sleeping, you should reevaluate the bedding. 

That means more than just the blankets. Replace threadbare sheets with new microfiber sheets, which are great if your child gets hot while sleeping. Hand-me-down mattresses, while cost-effective, can become worn down and lose their cushioning. At The Slumber Yard, we know a thing or two about mattresses, so be sure to check out our picks for the best kids mattresses for 2021.

Weighted blankets

Weighted blankets are another way that can help improve your child’s sleep. The heaviness allows the blanket to cloak the body, providing feelings of security and safety in addition to the extra comfort. Results seem to be hit or miss, with some parents reporting improved sleep while the American Academy of Pediatrics found no improvements. 

Weighted blankets continue to be a popular solution for sleep anxiety, but you should be cautious not to use too heavy of a blanket, which could affect your child’s circulation and even lead to suffocation. Instead, many parents use these before bed to help their children settle down.

The Bottom Line 

Much of the future remains uncertain as coronavirus continues to ravage the world. Parents certainly have their hands full as they try to calm frayed nerves and adjust to a new world. Children are especially sensitive, so they too are being affected by the upset in their homes and a tense emotional climate. 

Now more than ever, children need reassurance and security, and bedtime is one of the best times to reinforce this stability. Meditation and mindfulness apps can help protect your child’s mental health by reinforcing their emotional well-being and establishing confidence and security on a regular basis. The routine of bedtime meditation or yoga can help quiet worry and fear, and prepare your child for sleep so they can get the rest they need. 

Spread

How does the virus spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in many affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Can the virus that cause COVID-19 be spread through food, including take out, refrigerated or frozen packaged food?

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person to person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day use a tissue to cover your coughing or sneezing, and wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature affect the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like those that cause the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

What is community spread?

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected. Each health department determines community spread differently based on local conditions. For information on community spread in your area, please visit your health department’s website.​

Can mosquitoes or ticks spread the virus that causes COVID-19?

At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.

Prevention

How can I protect myself?

Visit the How to Protect Yourself & Others page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.
Does the CDC recommend the use of facemask or face coverings to prevent COVI-19?

Wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people not living in your household and particularly where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations. Cloth face coverings may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.

COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. That’s why it’s important for everyone to practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet away from other people) and wear cloth face coverings in public settings. Cloth face coverings provide an extra layer to help prevent the respiratory droplets from traveling in the air and onto other people.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

More information about cloth face coverings can be found on our cloth face coverings site.

Is it safe to get care for my other medical conditions during this time?

  • It is important to continue taking care of your health and wellness.
  • Continue your medications, and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Continue to manage your disease the way your healthcare provider has told you.
  • Have at least a 2-week supply of all prescription and non-prescription medications.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether your vaccinations are up-to-date.
  • Call your healthcare provider
    • if you have any concerns about your medical conditions, or if you get sick.
    • to find out about different ways you can connect with your healthcare provider for chronic disease management or other conditions.
  • Do not delay getting emergency care for your health problems or any health condition that requires immediate attention.
    • If you need emergency help, call 911.
    • Emergency departments have infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care for your medical condition.
  • Continue to practice everyday prevention. Wash your hands often, avoid close contact, wear a cloth face covering, cover coughs and sneezes, and clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces often.

For more information, see Groups at Higher Risk for Severe Illness.

Am I at risk for COVID-19 from mail, packages, or products?

There is still a lot that is unknown about COVID-19 and how it spreads. Coronaviruses are thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Although the virus can survive for a short period on some surfaces, it is unlikely to be spread from domestic or international mail, products or packaging. However, it may be possible that people can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Learn more about safe handling of deliveries and mail.

Is it okay for me to donate blood?

In healthcare settings across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time.

If You or Someone You Know is Sick or Had Contact with Someone who Has COVID-19

What should I do if I get sick or someone in my house gets sick?

Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
  • Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.

However, some people may need emergency medical attention. Watch for symptoms and learn when to seek emergency medical attention.

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

What should I do if I have had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

  • Be alert for symptoms. Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if you have symptoms.

Children

What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19?

Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date. However, a few children have developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Currently, information about this syndrome is limited. CDC is working with state and local health departments to learn more about MIS-C.

How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection?

You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects, like tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

You can find additional information on preventing COVID-19 at How to Protect Yourself & Others. Additional information on how COVID-19 is spread is available at How COVID-19 Spreads.

More information on Keeping Children Healthy during the COVID-19 Outbreak is available online.

Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults?

No. The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. COVID-19 can look different in different people. For many people, being sick with COVID-19 would be a little bit like having the flu. People can get a fever, cough, or have a hard time taking deep breaths. Most people who have gotten COVID-19 have not gotten very sick. Only a small group of people who get it have had more serious problems.

CDC and partners are investigating cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19. Learn more about COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C).

Should children wear masks?

CDC recommends that everyone 2 years and older wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth in public settings when around people not living in your household, particularly where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Masks should NOT be put on babies or children younger than 2 because of the danger of suffocation. Children younger than 2 years of age are listed as an exception as well as anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community?

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. When you talk with your child, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. Talk to your children about COVID-19 and help them cope with stress.

What is multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) and who is at risk?

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. We do not yet know what causes MIS-C. However, we know that many children with MIS-C had the virus that causes COVID-19, or had been around someone with COVID-19. MIS-C can be serious, even deadly, but most children who were diagnosed with this condition have gotten better with medical care.

Contact your child’s doctor, nurse, or clinic right away if your child is showing symptoms of MIS-C. Seek emergency care right away if your child is showing any of these emergency warning signs of MIS-C or other concerning signs.

Can my child hang out with their friends?

The key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to practice social distancing. While school is out, children should not have in-person playdates with children from other households. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household. Some children with certain underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Make sure children practice everyday preventive behaviors, such as washing their hands often with soap and water. Remember, if children meet outside of school in groups, it can put everyone at risk.

For more information, see Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19 in Children.

How can I help my child continue learning?

  • Stay in touch with your child’s school.
    • Many schools are offering lessons online (virtual learning). Review assignments from the school, and help your child establish a reasonable pace for completing the work. You may need to assist your child with turning on devices, reading instructions, and typing answers.
  • Create a schedule and routine for learning at home, but remain flexible.
  • Consider the needs and adjustment required for your child’s age group.
    • The transition to being at home will be different for preschoolers, K-5, middle school students, and high school students. Talk to your child about expectations and how they are adjusting to being at home versus at school.
  • Look for ways to make learning fun.

For more information, see Help Children Learn at Home.

How can I help my child continue learning?

  • Stay in touch with your child’s school.
    • Many schools are offering lessons online (virtual learning). Review assignments from the school, and help your child establish a reasonable pace for completing the work. You may need to assist your child with turning on devices, reading instructions, and typing answers.
  • Create a schedule and routine for learning at home, but remain flexible.
  • Consider the needs and adjustment required for your child’s age group.
    • The transition to being at home will be different for preschoolers, K-5, middle school students, and high school students. Talk to your child about expectations and how they are adjusting to being at home versus at school.
  • Look for ways to make learning fun.

For more information, see Help Children Learn at Home.

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